The Research
Discover what the research has found:
1. Bales of hay steamed for 50 minutes in the HAYGAIN HG1000 were devoid of fungi and yeast and the total viable count (TVC) of bacteria reduced by 86%.
James, R. and Moore-Colyer, M.J.S. (2010) The effect of steam treatment on the total viable count, mould and yeast numbers in hay using the Haygain steamer. 5th European Workshop for Equine Nutrition, Cirencester, Sept 2010. The Impact of nutrition on the health and welfare of horses. EAAP publication No. 128. Ed Ellis, A., Longland, A.C.,Coenen, M and Miraglia, N.p 128-132
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2. This study showed the nutritional profile of the hay basically stays the same after a 50 minute cycle in the HAYGAIN HG1000 taking the average of 30 different hays. The only nutrient lost was WSC (sugar) which was a small but significant reduction. James, R. and Moore-Colyer, M.J.S. (2013) Hay for horses: The nutrient content of hay before and after steam treatment in a commercial hay steamer. Proceedings of British Society of Animal Science Conference, Nottingham April 2013. p102
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3. This research used four different hays with varying degrees of quality and showing that a 50 minute steam in the HAYGAIN HG1000 was effective at reducing respirable particles in all hays, whether only slightly dusty or highly contaminated.
Stockdale, C and Moore-Colyer, M.J.S (2010) Steaming hay for horses: The effect of three different treatments on the respirable particle numbers in hay treated in the Haygain steamer. 5th European Workshop for Equine Nutrition, Cirencester, Sept 2010. The Impact of nutrition on the health and welfare of horses. EAAP publication No. 128. Ed Ellis, A., Longland, A.C., Coenen, M and Miraglia, N. p136-138
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4. This study found that given the choice steamed hay was preferred over dry and soaked hay. HAYGAIN steamed hay, once tasted was always the first to be consumed.
Moore-Colyer, M.J.S. and Payne, V. Palatability and ingestion behaviour of 6 polo ponies offered a choice of dry, soaked and steamed hay for 1 hour on three separate occasions. Advances in Animal Biosciences. Healthy Food from Healthy Animals. Vol 3 part 1. p127
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5. A second and separate palatability trial further demonstrating that horses prefer to eat steamed hay compared with haylage and dry hay.
Brown, E., Tracey, S and Gowers, I. (2013) An investigation to determine the palatability of steamed hay, dry hay and haylage. Proceedings of British Society of Animal Science Conference, Nottingham April 2013. p 104
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6. This study found the HAYGAIN HG600 to be the most effective treatment for improving the hygienic quality of the hay while soaking was found to vastly increase bacteria.
Moore-Colyer, M.J.S and Fillery, B.G. (2012) The Effect of three different treatments on the respirable particle content, total viable count and mould concentrations in hay for horses. 6th European Workshop for Equine Nutrition, Lisbon, Portugal, June 20-22nd. P101-106
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7. Steaming increased the amount of hay eaten, but the rate of intake and amount of chewing was not affected.
J.D.Pagan, C.Whitehouse, B.M. Waldridge, A.M.Grev, S.W.Garling, O.L.Yates, S. Davis and B. James (2012) The effect of soaking or steaming timothy hay on voluntary intake and digestibility in Thoroughbred horses at the Kentucky Equine Research centre. Equine Science Society Symposium 2012.
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8. An increase of 64% TVC (bacteria) and 75% mould concentrations was found in haylage open and left for 4 days. Steaming haylage in the HG600 significantly reduced microbial growth, even after 4 days of being left open, with 99% and 70% lower levels than a freshly opened bale.
Leggatt, P. and Moore-Colyer, M.J.S (2013). The effect of steam treatment on the bacteria yeast and mould concentrations in haylage for horses. Proceedings of British Society of Animal Science Conference, Nottingham April 2013. p 103
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9. This research indicates that steaming reduces the RAO-affected horse’s response to hay which coincides with a reduction in viable fungal content of hay.
Blumerich, C.A., Buechner-Maxwell, V.A., Scrratt, W.K., Wilson, K.E., Ricco, C., Becvarova, I., Hodgson, J. and Were, S. (2012) Comparison of airway response of Recurrent Airway Obstruction affected horses fed steamed versus non-steamed hay. Proceedings of the Annual ACVIM Conference, 2012.
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10. This study showed that horses preferred to eat steamed hay compared with haylage and dry hay.
Brown, E., Tracey, S and Gowers, I. (2013) An investigation to determine the palatability of steamed hay, dry hay and haylage. Proceedings of British Society of Animal Science Conference, Nottingham April 2013. p 104
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11. A comparison of different steaming techniques was done in this experiment which showed that steaming in a specifically designed hay steamer (HG 600) was significantly more effective at reducing microbes in hay compared with home-made steamers and soaking.
Taylor, J. and Moore-Colyer, M.J.S. (2013). The effect of five different wetting treatments on the microbial concentration in hay for horses. Proceedings of the European Equine Health and Nutrition Congress. Ghent, Belgium March 2013
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12. Soaking hay for 9 hours followed by steaming for 50 minutes in the HG steamer was the most effective method for reducing both WSC and microbial contamination in hay.
Moore-Colyer MJS, Lumbis K, Longland AC, Harris PA. (2014).The effect of five different wetting treatments on the water soluble carbohydrate content and microbial concentration in hay for horses. Plos One.
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13. The effect of design, and management regime on the respirable particle concentrations in 2 different types of horse stables
Proceedings of the Equi Horse Facilities Conference Lion D’Angers, France, October 2014 Shavings and steamed hay produced the lowest level of respirable dust across both zones and stable types and thus is the preferred management regime for stabled horses.
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14. Forage in the stable – techniques for reducing the respirable challenge and microbial content in hay.
Proceedings of the Dorothy Russel Havemeyer Foundation IAD Workshop. Cabourg. France October 2014. Steaming in HG 600 is the most effective method for reducing RP and microbial contamination of hay. Incomplete steaming increased the bacteria content compromising the hygienic quality of hay.
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15. Steaming and disinfecting straw reduces RP and microbial content and will allow the horse to benefit from the behavioural advantages of straw without compromising respiratory health.
Murihead V. (2014) The effect of steam and Protek Envirocair on the respirable particle, mould and bacteria content in two types of straw bedding for horses. BSc thesis, Royal Agricultural University, Cirencester, UK.
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16. This study showed that 49% of people working with horses suffer from a respiratory disorder and that filling hay nets with dry hay and bedding horses on straw increase the likelihood of suffering from a respiratory disease.
Gosling K (2014).The prevalence of human respiratory disorders in UK equine industry personnel BSc thesis, Royal Agricultural College, Cirencester, UK
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17. Investigation into the effect of different treatments on Hay and Haylage on forage pH levels, in relation to EGUS in the horse.
Dewhurst J, (2014) The effect of soaking or steaming in the HG 600 hay steamer on the pH pH of hay and haylage. BSc thesis Royal Agricultural University, Cirencester, UK.
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